Rocky Mountain Brewing News February/March 2010 : Page 1

Vol. 8, No. 1 February/March 2010 By Maggie Boleyn By Lucy Saunders If the monks who brew beer call it “liquid bread,” then for Valentine’s Day, think of it as “liquid cake.” Craft beer and chocolate make a completely harmonious match, whether prepared together in a recipe, or paired at the table. There is neuroscience behind the choice. Chocolate releases the same dopamine chemicals in the brain trig- gered by romantic love, and beer tends to relax and reduce social inhibitions, which makes the process of tasting beer and chocolate all the more enjoyable. The feel-good combination of fer- mented cocoa beans and fermented grain is popular across North America. In my hometown of Milwaukee, chefs such as John Raymond of Roots and Jason Gorman of Dream Dance have turned to chocolate and cocoa in their beer dinners as staple ingredients to highlight the roasty flavors of a dark stout or a bock lager. Not just any beer, mind you. The best possible matches, in keeping with the sweet spirit of the day, are harmoni- ous, melding complementary flavors of roasted cocoa beans and roasted barley malts, and perhaps just a bit of heat from a peppery nose of alcohol. In Colorado, Odell Brewing Co. offers a Cutthroat Porter that makes a wonderful pairing with chocolate.. Cocoa powder, cocoa nibs (the bits of the roasted cacao pod before conching into chocolate) and even real chocolate have been used to brew beer. In 1995, the Whitbread Brewing Co. in the UK launched a chocolate beer, the Fuggles Chocolate Ale flavored with cocoa extract. Samuel Adams Chocolate Bock is aged with cocoa nibs from the Swiss chocolatier, Feltin. Southern Tier Brewing Co. brews its Choklat Imperial Stout with real Belgian chocolate, for a beer that tastes like liquid chocolate. Viking Brewery of Dallas, WI even makes a seasonal Hot Chocolate, a choc- olate stout brewed with organic cocoa and a pinch of cayenne pepper. The aro- matics of bittersweet cocoa, roasted cof- fee notes, and the peppery finish make this a versatile ale for dessert or dinner. I love barley wines and Belgian dubbels paired with dark chocolate desserts, since the warming strength of the higher-gravity ales can match the intense, fermented flavors in the darkest chocolates. Bocks, porters and stouts meld with milk chocolates or desserts that blend chocolate with nuts, caramel or other berry fruits. Fruit beers, such as cherry or raspberry ales, are also good choices to pair with dark chocolates - or as Sebbie Buhler, the woman whose image graces the label of Rogue Ales Chocolate Stout, recommends - mix half raspberry framboise, half Rogue Chocolate Stout as a dessert drink. Sprecher Brewery blended raspberry and chocolate flavors in their Generation Porter, a special release first made for their 20th anniversary in 2005, and re-issued as a limited release. My favorite experiment: pairing a very hoppy IPA with a taste of super dark, 70 percent cocoa solids premium See Harmonious Mix p.3 I admit it; I really like watching reruns of “Gunsmoke” on cable. Aside from the obvious escapism, there’s often real wisdom in the character’s remarks. Consider this scene in the Long Branch Saloon: after the busty barmaid delivered tall mugs of beer to a table full of rough and ready characters, one pointed to his brew and exclaimed, “Now that thar’s some medicine that does a man good!” Yessiree, pard- ner, there’s some real smarts in those words of Festus Hagan, diligent deputy in Marshall Dillion’s Dodge City: beer as medicine. Others are also seeing beer as an adjunct to good health, for men and women. Read on: Bone up on Beer Older women are often prone to devel- oping thin, brittle bones, or osteopo- rosis. Since there is no known cure for osteoporosis, prevention is said to be the best medicine. And, all together now, readers, what is the other best medicine? That’s right! Beer! Recent research has shown once again that beer can help stop bones from becom- ing brittle. The study found that women who drink beer regularly have strong bones. This means they are less likely to suffer from osteoporosis. See Beer Medicine p.3 Cooking on Tap ........ 4 Business of Beer ...... 5 Beer Directory ....10-12 Utah ........................ 6 Montana .................. 7 Idaho ...................... 8 Wyoming ................ 8 Colordado ........ 13-18

Beer & Chocolate: A Harmonious Mix

If the monks who brew beer call it “liquid bread,” then for Valentine’s Day, think of it as “liquid cake.” Craft beer and chocolate make a completely harmonious match, whether prepared together in a recipe, or paired at the table.

There is neuroscience behind the choice. Chocolate releases the same dopamine chemicals in the brain triggered by romantic love, and beer tends to relax and reduce social inhibitions, which makes the process of tasting beer and chocolate all the more enjoyable.

The feel-good combination of fermented cocoa beans and fermented grain is popular across North America.

In my hometown of Milwaukee, chefs such as John Raymond of Roots and Jason Gorman of Dream Dance have turned to chocolate and cocoa in their beer dinners as staple ingredients to highlight the roasty flavors of a dark stout or a bock lager.

Not just any beer, mind you. The best possible matches, in keeping with the sweet spirit of the day, are harmonious, melding complementary flavors of roasted cocoa beans and roasted barley malts, and perhaps just a bit of heat from a peppery nose of alcohol.

In Colorado, Odell Brewing Co.

Offers a Cutthroat Porter that makes a wonderful pairing with chocolate.. Cocoa powder, cocoa nibs (the bits of the roasted cacao pod before conching into chocolate) and even real chocolate have been used to brew beer.

In 1995, the Whitbread Brewing Co. In The UK launched a chocolate beer, the Fuggles Chocolate Ale flavored with cocoa extract. Samuel Adams Chocolate Bock is aged with cocoa nibs from the Swiss chocolatier, Feltin. Southern Tier Brewing Co. Brews its Choklat Imperial Stout with real Belgian chocolate, for a beer that tastes like liquid chocolate.

Viking Brewery of Dallas, WI even makes a seasonal Hot Chocolate, a chocolate stout brewed with organic cocoa and a pinch of cayenne pepper. The aromatics of bittersweet cocoa, roasted coffee notes, and the peppery finish make this a versatile ale for dessert or dinner.

I love barley wines and Belgian dubbels paired with dark chocolate desserts, since the warming strength of the higher-gravity ales can match the intense, fermented flavors in the darkest chocolates. Bocks, porters and stouts meld with milk chocolates or desserts that blend chocolate with nuts, caramel or other berry fruits. Fruit beers, such as cherry or raspberry ales, are also good choices to pair with dark chocolates - or as Sebbie Buhler, the woman whose image graces the label of Rogue Ales Chocolate Stout, recommends - mix half raspberry framboise, half Rogue Chocolate Stout as a dessert drink.

Sprecher Brewery blended raspberry and chocolate flavors in their Generation Porter, a special release first made for their 20th anniversary in 2005, and re-issued as a limited release.

My favorite experiment: pairing a very hoppy IPA with a taste of super dark, 70 percent cocoa solids premium Chocolate. The tang of the Cascade hops accented the dark chocolate almost as citrus zest would, with a sparkling, tart finish.

Home cooks can pair the flavors of beer with chocolate in savory sauces, such as chocolate and chile mole for roasted meats, or in sweets such as fresh-baked desserts. I’ve made brownies, cookies, ice cream, syrup topping for ice cream, mousse filling For cake and frostings, and more. Here is a recipe from my cookbook, “The Best of American Beer and Food” (Brewers Publications, $22.95), which brings together beer and chocolate in a flourless chocolate cake filled with molten ganache, perfect for a Valentine’s Day dessert for beer lovers.

Read the full article at http://rmbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Beer+%26amp%3B+Chocolate%3A+A+Harmonious+Mix/324455/32018/article.html.

Beer: Medicine That Doesa Man Good

Maggie Boleyn

I admit it; I really like watching reruns of “Gunsmoke” on cable. Aside from the obvious escapism, there’s often real wisdom in the character’s remarks. Consider this scene in the Long Branch Saloon: after the busty barmaid delivered tall mugs of beer to a table full of rough and ready characters, one pointed to his brew and exclaimed, “Now that thar’s some medicine that does a man good!” Yessiree, pardner, there’s some real smarts in those words of Festus Hagan, diligent deputy in Marshall Dillion’s Dodge City: beer as medicine.

Others are also seeing beer as an adjunct to good health, for men and women. Read on: Older women are often prone to developing thin, brittle bones, or osteoporosis.

Since there is no known cure for osteoporosis, prevention is said to be the best medicine. And, all together now, readers, what is the other best medicine? That’s right! Beer! Recent research has shown once again that beer can help stop bones from becoming brittle. The study found that women who drink beer regularly have strong bones. This means they are less likely to suffer from osteoporosis.


High silicon levels in beer slow down the thinning that leads to fractures and also boosts formation of new bone in both men and women. The silicon found in beer is readily available to help the body boost bone formation. “Beer is also rich in phytoestrogens, which helps keep bones healthy, too,” the prime mate added.

The researchers asked almost 1,700 healthy women with an average age of 48 about their drinking habits. The women then underwent ultrasound scans of their hands, which showed the densest hand bones belonged to beer drinkers. The better to raise your glass in a toast to marvelous, medicinal beer!

Keep Hopping Once again, hops have been proven to be a boon to healthy living. German researchers studied the effects of Xanthohumol, a hop-derived beer component which has anticancer and antimicrobial activities. Like Other cells, Red Blood Cells (erythrocytes, or RBCs) may undergo cell death when subjected to stress or energy depletion. This often leads to anemia, and the dead red cells may impede circulation.

Experiments explored whether xanthohumol influences cell death. The scientists found that xanthohumol is a potent inhibitor of RBC death.

Also, recent research at Oregon State University found that a compound in beer may slow down the growth of cells that cause enlarged prostates. The study found that xanthohumol has shown promise in slowing down growth of cells that cause enlarged prostates. Of course, the scientists issued the obligatory statement that the conclusion cannot be drawn that drinking beer is a way to prevent prostate cancer. The Amount of xanthohumol found to be effective would be equivalent to the amount present in 17 beers. Ok, bad idea. An Australian study found that heavy drinkers (more than 14 drinks per week) have a 20 percent increase in prostate cancer.


All Eyes on This

The results of the Bejing Eye Study were published in late 2009.

The researchers found that self-reported moderate consumption of alcohol does not have a significant effect on the prevalence of major eye diseases such as glaucoma, macular degeneration or diabetic eye problems. Beeras- medicine deniers will, of course, point out that this study was based on self-reported consumption. Respondents in self reported studies may alter their responses to conform to what they believe are researcher’s expectations.

Or, they may respond truthfully. But, hey, sloppy science is all the rage.

Best Book Bet

Nothing sloppy about the 2009 Winner of the Best Drinks and Health Book in the World. Beer in Health and Disease Prevention, written by Victor R. Preedy, is a collection of the most current writings on the subject of beer and it’s potential in health. At 1248 pages, it is a very comprehensive volume.

Hop, Hop Hurray!

Celebrate wisely this month with your sweetie. (Of course, “wisely” is defined as moderate consumption of craft beer!)

Read the full article at http://rmbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Beer%3A+Medicine+That+Doesa+Man+Good/324461/32018/article.html.

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