Rocky Mountain Brewing News October/November 2011 : Page 1

ROCKY MOUNTAIN E WI R B NG NE W S By John Campbell Yeast was an integral part of my childhood memories, although I didn’t think about it at the time. I grew up on a farm during the period when farmers were transitioning from horses to tractors. People in those days worked hard to make the best of what they had. They were mostly self-reliant for all their needs and wants. They put in big gardens, churned butter, butchered, canned and cured meat for the winter. They picked berries and grew rhubarb for making pies or wine. Best of all was the homemade bread and the smell of yeast fi ll-ing the room. My best bud, Sonny, lived a fi ve-minute walk from our house on several acres with his aunt and uncle. They lived on enough land to have a garden, milk cow, chickens, pigs, and a giant grape arbor of Concord grapes which his uncle used to make wine. One day Sonny and I slipped into his uncle’s toolshed to check out the big wooden barrel he fi lled each year with new grape wine. I didn’t know it at the time but I was being introduced to another purpose for yeast. That barrel became our donnybrook. One day we snuck back into the shed and drew off a fruit jar of his uncle’s wine and slithered off to the woods and drank it. My parents found me and nursed me back to health, but from that point on I was destined to learn how to make wine. When I was older and newly married I pursued opening my own winery. I visited local wineries and purchased every book on the subject I could find and bought concen-trated wine kits, making a variety of wines See Yeast p.3 Kelly and Cary Floyd owners of the Arvada Beer Company in Olde Town Arvada, CO. PHOTO BY JIM "DOC" DAMON. The original Arvada building c. 1917. By Jim Damon style.” His goal was to score 35 (of a possible y the time you read this, Cary and Kelly Floyd should be open-50 points) on every entry-a goal which he rarely missed during the next fi ve years. ing the doors to their brand-new Cary began dating Kelly in 2004. Soon brewpub, the Arvada Beer after, he invited her over to watch him brew. Company located in the heart She admits that she wasn’t much of a beer of Olde Town Arvada, Colo., at 5600 Olde drinker, but after watching Cary brew a batch Wadsworth. This will be the culmination of of marzen, she commented, “It doesn’t look Cary’s seven-year plan, which is now coming that hard.” He then challenged her to brew a to fruition. batch. The next weekend, she also brewed a Cary began brewing extract beers in 1994, inspired by a friend in the San Fran-See Arvada p.3 cisco Bay Area. After moving to the Denver area, he continued brewing Arvada is a historic rail town outside with extract until May of 2000 when he attended a homebrew day spon-of Denver, Colorado. sored by KROC, a local homebrew club. He credits Scott Jackson as the brewer who converted him to the all grain brewing process. Continuing to perfect his brewing techniques, Cary won his fi rst home brew medal in 2002 for a schwartzbier at the Dixie Cup Competition in Texas. As he continued to brew with encouraging results in 2004, he decided to open his own brewery and laid out his seven-year plan. His mantra became “precision brewing to FLICKR B PHOTO COURTESY OF ARVADA BEER CO. Beer Round Up ... 3 Homebrew .......... 7 NIPAC 2012 ........ 8 Beer Directory ....10 Idaho ...................... Utah ....................... Montana ................. Wyoming ................ 4 5 6 8 Colorado Western Slope ........... 9 Upper Front Range ...13 Central Peaks .......... 14 Four Corners ........... 15 Denver ..................... 16 Lower Front Range ...18 Hans Granheim 2011

Growing Older And Wiser With Yeast

John Campbell

Yeast was an integral part of my childhood memories, although I didn’t think about it at the time. I grew up on a farm during the period when farmers were transitioning from horses to tractors. People in those days worked hard to make the best of what they had.They were mostly self-reliant for all their needs and wants. They put in big gardens, churned butter, butchered, canned and cured meat for the winter.They picked berries and grew rhubarb for making pies or wine. Best of all was the homemade bread and the smell of yeast filling the room.

My best bud, Sonny, lived a five-minute walk from our house on several acres with his aunt and uncle. They lived on enough land to have a garden, milk cow, chickens, pigs, and a giant grape arbor of Concord grapes which his uncle used to make wine.One day Sonny and I slipped into his uncle’s toolshed to check out the big wooden barrel he filled each year with new grape wine. I didn’t know it at the time but I was being introduced to another purpose for yeast. That barrel became our donnybrook.One day we snuck back into the shed and drew off a fruit jar of his uncle’s wine and slithered off to the woods and drank it. My parents found me and nursed me back to health, but from that point on I was destined to learn how to make wine.

When I was older and newly married I pursued opening my own winery. I visited local wineries and purchased every book on the subject I could find and bought concentrated wine kits, making a variety of wines Over the next few years. That was when I became aware of how many varieties of yeast there were to choose from to make wine.Bread yeast wasn’t the only yeast in existence!

Jump to the eighties, when the microbrew business started to emerge, which was also the time when home brewing started to gain momentum. Better supplies and equipment were becoming available at reasonable prices. My wife gave me a beer-making kit for Christmas. I made two brews with kits before I got bored with extract brews. I decided, cold turkey, to go to all grain. I wandered into a homebrew shop in Spokane, Wash., and saw my next purchase sitting in the corner. I emptied my wallet and made arrangements to have a system built. I designed the system to be fully functional with one pump, lots of valves and a hot liquor tank that was gravity-fed...no filling pails and dumping hot liquids.

Liquid Yeast

Up to that point I had been using dry yeast out of a packet, but I thought using dry yeast with all grain seemed somehow… not right. I bought a book on yeast written by David Logsdon. It was a little glossy white book on the care and feeding of yeast. I couldn’t put it down! The more I learned the more I wanted to experiment with yeast. I made enough agar slants (test tubes filled with liquid agar and allowed to cool and harden at an angle) to last years.I bought a cheap microscope and observed yeast multiplying before my very eyes.

One day I had a question and discovered a phone number in the helpful little yeast book. After dialing the number, David Logsdon answered! It was shocking that I was actually talking with the man who had become my hero. He was very pleasant and answered all my questions and then some. Logsdon started a yeast company called Wyeast Laboratories. The list of varieties of yeast available blew me away! The first liquid yeast I owned came from Wyeast—I started with London ale yeast, which suited my personal taste quite well. It went on to be the yeast of my commercial brewery several years later.

What Does Yeast Bring To Beer?

Yeast is a significant contributor to the flavor, aroma and clarity of beer. For example, hefeweizen (hefe - means yeast in German and weizen - means wheat) is an unfiltered beer that is cloudy because of yeast that remains in suspension. A classic example of a new style of hefeweizen is American hefeweizen, created by Widmer Brothers when, because of a shortage of fermenters, they decided not to filter their weizenbier. Another example of yeast being used in a manner other than intended is steam beer. Steam beer is made by using lager yeast but fermenting at ale yeast temperatures. An iconic example of steam beer is brewed by Anchor Steam Brewery. Other classic examples of beers heavily impacted by yeast are German weissbier which has a definite clove taste, saison, or farmhouse ale, with its slight sourness and coriander bitterness, and Belgian styles displaying coriander, banana, and clove such as New Belgium’s Abbey Ale.

Yeasts are eukaryotic micro-organisms classified in the kingdom Fungi, with 1,500 species currently described. By the process of fermentation, the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols.Essentially brewers, or vintners, do not make beer or wine, the yeast does. The brewer is responsible for the preparation of the right ingredients and environment for the yeast to do their job.

The moral of this story? Next time you sip your favorite brewski, remember to toast those little Saccharomyces working their hearts out to bring you that beer!

Read the full article at http://rmbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Growing+Older+And+Wiser+With+Yeast/862984/84708/article.html.

Arvada brewing company

Jim Damon

By the time you read this, Cary and Kelly Floyd should be opening the doors to their brand-new brewpub, the Arvada Beer Company located in the heart of Olde Town Arvada, Colo., at 5600 Olde Wadsworth. This will be the culmination of Cary’s seven-year plan, which is now coming to fruition.

Cary began brewing extract beers in 1994, inspired by a friend in the San Francisco Bay Area. After moving to the Denver area, he continued brewing with extract until May of 2000 when he attended a homebrew day sponsored by KROC, a local homebrew club. He credits Scott Jackson as the brewer who converted him to the all grain brewing process. Continuing to perfect his brewing techniques, Cary won his first home brew medal in 2002 for a schwartzbier at the Dixie Cup Competition in Texas.

As he continued to brew with encouraging results in 2004, he decided to open his own brewery and laid out his seven-year plan. His mantra became “precision brewing to Style.” His goal was to score 35 (of a possible 50 points) on every entry-a goal which he rarely missed during the next five years.

Cary began dating Kelly in 2004. Soon after, he invited her over to watch him brew.She admits that she wasn’t much of a beer drinker, but after watching Cary brew a batch of marzen, she commented, “It doesn’t look that hard.” He then challenged her to brew a batch. The next weekend, she also brewed Batch of marzen-the exact same beer. They entered both of these beers in the Colorado State Fair. Cary won a silver medal while Kelly nabbed the gold medal. As they say, the rest is history.

Kelly likes to research her recipes thoroughly in order to obtain the best possible result. She has absolutely no fear when it comes to approaching new beer styles. After two months of research, she created an award-winning Russian imperial stout. After she heard that light lagers were difficult to brew, she brewed one, and captured a gold medal.She loves everything about the brewing process, including the smell of the malt, the aroma of the hops, and the education that comes with learning to brew new styles. In 2006, she won the Queen of Beer award from the Hazed Club in California. She won the best of show in 2007 with an English mild by perfecting the water profile. Her marzen won her the Queen of Beer for a second time in 2009.

An admitted hophead, Cary’s favorite styles include hoppy pils, IPA, marzen, and doppelbock. He doesn’t especially care for Belgians, although he has brewed several award-winning ones.

In 2006, both Cary and Kelly became certified beer judges, enabling them to further perfect their precision and brewing to style. They both began brewing in earnest one to three batches a week, allowing them to enter 20 beers per competition and win over 400 home brewing medals. They retired from the amateur ranks At the end of 2009 in order to devote their full energies to building Arvada Beer Company.

Construction of the Arvada Beer Company began after Cary signed a lease on a 90-year-old building in October of 2010. Unfortunately, the age of the building presented many construction problems, all of which delayed the opening.

Dennis O’ Harrow, a locally prominent brewer, was selected to be the chief brewer, with significant contributions coming from both Cary and Kelly. Trained in England, Dennis’ expertise in English ales will complement Cary’s skill in brewing German-style beers.

Within the next year, Cary plans to have a bottling line and promote off-site sales. Other projects on the near horizon include making lower alcohol sparkling mead to appeal to non-beer drinkers. They will also respond to several requests for a gluten-free beer, as they will be making a pilot batch soon. Kelly has also expressed a desire to make new types of cider and perry.

The first planned event is already in place, featuring the documentary Beer Culture, which will be shown at the brewpub, between October 18 and 20. It will be cosponsored by the Jefferson County Library Adult Education Program. One of Kelly’s goals is to provide education at all possible levels.Beer tours will be available on premises soon after the opening. Cary emphasizes, “We love this town and want to be part of the local community.”

When asked what the future will bring, Cary replied, “We will focus on what got us here...brewing beers to style!”

Read the full article at http://rmbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Arvada+brewing+company/862987/84708/article.html.

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